Narconon UK Promotes its Services to Practitioners of Alternative Medicine

narconon-ukFor today’s post, I am indebted to an supporter of osteopathy, who has provided some interesting information about the activities of Narconon, which recently opened a small facility in the UK

Narconon is a  Scientology front group, which claims to provide paid drug rehabilitation treatment, but actually delivers Scientology indoctrination.

The website Osteobiz, aims to coach osteopaths on the business side of their occupation. In one entry, the author warns about a range of cons and swindles which osteopaths are liable to be exposed to.

One of these is headlined “The Drug Rehab Centre Scam”… and that’s where Narconon comes in. Continue reading

“This is Life: An Introduction to Scientology” by Reg Sharpe – The Church of Scientology Bans Its Own Books (Pt3)

aThis is Life: an Introduction to Scientology  | Reg Sharpe | Graphis Press Ltd | 1961
Download as .pdf (click on text link ‘Download in Browser’).

As I have described in a previous post the Church of Scientology not only has a list of banned books, but this list consists of works written by Scientologists in good standing which were once published with official approval and sold through orgs.

In 1983 (three years before Hubbards death)  all of these texts were withdrawn, and only books by L Ron Hubbard were permitted. Scientologists are not allowed to read them, now. Only books by Hubbard himself are deemed to contain ‘true Scientology’.

“This is Life” is a book about Scientology  published in 1961. It has been written by a very prominent Scientologist of the period.  Reg Sharpe was the personal assistant of L Ron Hubbard and the book was clearly endorsed by Hubbard himself, so it was quite influential among Scientologists.

The full text can be downloaded from the link above. This is a direct scan of an original copy of the book which, as far as I know, is available nowhere else online.

Continue reading

Scientology’s ‘Super Power Briefing Pack’ – And This Blog is 2yrs Old Today

SP BuildingScientology’s ‘Super Power’ Briefing Pack| Download as .pdf

L Ron Hubbard’s behaviour towards his followers alternated between ‘stick’ and ‘carrot’. Repressive periods were occasionally relived by ‘amnesties’ and the announcement of ‘new breakthroughs’.

The “Super Power Rundowns” were one of the ‘breakthroughs,’ supposedly invented by L Ron Hubbard to reinvigorate his exhausted staff. Scientologists present this as an act of charity, overlooking the fact that it was Hubbard who had overworked them in the first place.

This material was not made available to rank and file Scientologists and was almost forgotten until many years after Hubbard died in 1986. Then, the Church of Scientology’s new leader, David Miscavige, repackaged and ‘enhanced’ it as a residential course that would require purpose built premises and special equipment to complete.

The renovation of a building bought for this purpose began in 1988, in Clearwater, Florida (the international HQ of the Church).  Although donations were continuously solicited the facilities were not completed until November 2013. Critics suggest that not all the money raised for the “Super Power Building” (now know as the “Flag Building”) went to the purpose intended.

This document is a ‘briefing pack’ for the people who were tasked with raising money for the realisation of  ‘Super Power.’  It’s a revealing insight into the bizarre beliefs and practices that circulate among the most ‘advanced’ Scientologists – and the induced paranoia that motivates their actions. Continue reading

The Church of Scientology Bans Its Own books (Pt 1) – Introduction

banned booksMost repressive organisations have a list of banned books. Scientology takes this one step further. In 1983, the Church of Scientology banned a number of texts which:

  1. Were written by Scientologists in good standing
  2. Promoted a very orthodox interpretation of Scientology
  3. Were published by the Church of Scientology
  4. Were sold for some time, with official approval, in Scientology Orgs.

In short, they banned their own books.

This had been had been happening informally for decades, but in 1983 it was formalised in an internal document. A substantial number of books about Scientology by Scientologists were banned, simply because they were not written by L Ron Hubbard

Admittedly many of these texts were pamphlets, and  their aim was limited. A typical disclaimer declared that the author’s purpose was, “to demonstrates various ways the author and others have successfully applied a few of the basic principles of Scientology”. Writing them required a minimum of original thought. They were all based on longer works by Hubbard who was given all credit at every opportunity.

After the break, I offer a theory as to why these texts were permitted for so long and why there were finally prohibited. There is also a partial list of banned books. If anyone has copies of any of these texts, I would be extremely grateful if you would contact me through this site’s feedback page.

In future posts in this series, I will closely examine the full text of at least four Scientology books banned by… The Church of Scientology. I hope that there will be more to come. Continue reading

“Marriage Hats” – A Rare Pamphlet Written by the Woman L Ron Hubbard Abandoned, and Published by the Church of Scientology

Mary Sue HubbardDownload as .pdf (source one) | Download as .pdf (source two) | Download as .pdf (source three)
Click on text link ‘Download through your Browser’

Thanks to a kind contributor I have acquired a scan of a rare 36-page pamphlet, written by Mary Sue Hubbard (the third wife of L Ron Hubbard). Entitled “Marriage Hats”. It consists of ‘marriage guidance’ for Scientologists from the then ‘first lady’ of the organisation.

It’s notable for a number of reasons.

Firstly, it’s one of a very few texts that were written by someone other than L Ron Hubbard and published by the Church of Scientology. As the Church became more repressive, and  Hubbard established himself as the only source of valid information for Scientologists, these publications were withdrawn and are now rare and difficult to obtain.

Also, the author Mary Sue Hubbard (née Whipp) was, for many years, the de facto deputy leader of Scientology.  Hubbard abandoned her in 1976 when  Scientology’s “Snow White“project (which his wife organised on a day-today basis) was compromised, and went into hiding.

This project had been tasked with:

  • ‘Correcting’ US government records concerning Scientology
  • Gathering intelligence which could be used to promote Scientology’s interests using illegal means.

Mary Sue was sentenced to five years in prison and fined $10,000 for her involvement. She served one year, and never saw her husband again.

She was not to know how badly her marriage would turn out when she wrote this pamphlet. It unselfconsciously presents the Hubbards as a model couple and shows the incredibly dated social attitudes of the Church of Scientology – an organisation which is still mired in the 1950’s. Continue reading

Scientology Can Exorcise Gremlins – Narconon ‘Drug Rehabilitation’ is Scientology in Disguise – Part 9

Narconon detox prog.pdfIn the last post in this series we started to examine the second book given to clients of Narconon, and saw that it is based on a Scientology practice (the “Purification Rundown” or “Purif”).

It is a picture-book version of L Ron Hubbard’s book, “Clear Body Clear Mind” (1990) which owes a lot to  ideas introduced in his self-published 1957 text “All About Radiation“.

So far, Hubbard has asserted that he has proved that drugs (including medicinal drugs) can be stored in fat cells, along with environmental pollutants and “radiation”. We have seen that this flies in the face of scientific knowledge and is not supported by published research. In the case of the claim about ‘radiation’ Hubbard does not even seen to understand the difference between a radioactive substance and radiation itself.

We take up the story at page 28.

Continue reading

What Does “Braco” (a New Online Guru) Have to Teach us About Scientology?

bracoThe image to the left shows Braco Ivica, a 48-year-old Croatian man known to his followers as “The Gazer”.

They believe that, if they return his gaze, he will somehow be able to ‘absorb’ their mental and physical ailments, and heal them. They make a variety of claims to this effect.

When Braco appears in public (for his followers to gaze upon him) he protects his mystique by a policy of enigmatic silence – he never, ever speaks a word. He hardly even moves. He also provides regular video feeds, enabling followers to experience his virtual gaze.

On the surface, there appears to be no similarity between Braco and Scientology. However, one of Scientology’s ‘training routines’ is actually very similar indeed to ‘gazing’.  I suspect that both Braco and the TR exploit the same compelling psychological phenomenon. After that, the parallels come thick and fast. Continue reading