“Ruthless”, a Book by the Father of Scientology’s Leader and “20/20 -A Father’s Story”

RuthlessUS_UK

US edition (left) & UK edition (right)

Ruthless: My Son David Miscavige and Me (UK Edition) | Ron Miscavige with Dan Koon | Silvertail Books | 2016

This book is based upon the experiences of Ron Miscavige, the father of David who is presently the ‘leader’ of Scientology. In it he discusses how he took his family into Scientology, how his son rose to power, and how he eventually escaped from a guarded Scientology compound.

From an outsider’s point of view this is an essential text for the things which Ron Miscavige reveals but, overall, a frustrating read.

The problem is with Ron himself. He is what people who study literature call an ‘unreliable narrator’ – he’s telling the truth as he sees it. Unfortunately, in his version of reality, Scientology should be taken seriously, and there are valuable insights in its early teachings.

Also, he is still impressed by writers who were big names in the (now largely forgotten) ‘New Thought‘ movement (AVA “Higher Thought). A list of recommended books appears at the end of his volume and recommends early works by Hubbard and some antique fringe writers of the ‘New Thought’ movements.

I happen to have one of the ‘New Thought’ texts he recommends (and will be putting it online in my next post). It’s a crude wish-fulfilment fantasy which depends on magical thinking. It claims that, if you follow the author’s instructions, you will be able to acquire anything you want, as long as you wish for it hard enough.

I’m not being sarcastic here. That’s literally the argument presented. If you are looking for a book with philosophical depth, or for a critical analysis of Scientology itself, you won’t get much out of this one.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Sects, Cults and the Attack on Jurisprudence – Scientology (and Others) in Court

Court2010 | Stephen A Kent  and Robin D Willey

View Online | Download as .pdf

Using examples from the US and Canada Kent and Willey observe the process that begins when a cult or sect  establishes its own internal rules and procedures.

They take great care to explain not only what they mean by ‘cult’ and ‘sect’, but also how and why they form. This discussion is worth reading for the wider perspective it provides.

Alternative legal systems established by cults will likely be:

  • Based on beliefs and doctrines which are not compatible with secular law.
  • Assert that they are superior – that theirs is  ‘a higher law’
  • Are supported by believers who are prepared to break secular law in order to promote their alternative

This sets the stage for serious conflict with representatives of the civil and criminal justice system –   when they are called to court, sects and cults often behave badly. Continue reading

America’s Book of Secrets: Scientology

AmericaBookofSecrets 2014 |America’s Book of Secrets: Scientology

Download .mp4

Streaming Link


“America’s Book of Secrets
takes a look at the hidden origins, strict doctrine, secret language and celebrity allure of the organization and how it dominates the lives of its followers.

Jenna Miscavige Hill, niece of Scientology’s current leader, David Miscavige, describes her difficult experiences and escape from the organization.

Former Scientology executive, Mark Rathbun, demonstrates and explains Scientology’s most revered spiritual technology: the ‘E-Meter.’

Raw Story’s Tony Ortega explains the draw and appeal of Scientology that allows them to recruit new members and keep their coffers full”.

(From “Raw Story“)

Lisa McPherson: Death in Slow Motion

lisa macphersonLisa McPherson: Death in slow Motion

2014 Lisa McPherson case: events leading to the death of Scientologist Lisa McPherson
Tampa Bay Times
Full Text Online HTML

2014 Death in Slow Motion
Tampa Bay Times
Full Text Online HTML
The surviving notes of Lisa McPherson’s Scientology ‘Watchers’
Download

The death of Lisa McPherson is a crucial event in Scientology’s history. After being declared ‘clear’ (apparently by the by the current leader of the church of Scientology, David Miscavige) she suffered a psychotic break – after a minor car accident, she took off all her clothes and wandered down the road in a confused state.

She refused medical treatment (Scientologists are taught to fear psychiatrists) and was instead subjected to a Scientology procedure, the ‘Introspection Rundown’ which is is described here (and is available for download)  in another post.

Critics suggest that the cause of her death was neglect and dehydration, the result of a collision  between the demanding reality of caring for a person undergoing a psychotic break, and the rigid requirements of Scientology doctrine.

These three links provide a overview of events, and explain the wider implications of this tragic an unnecessary death.

Continue reading

Scientology: The Hole

tampa bay times2013 Scientology: The Hole  | Tampa Bay Times

For years in a desert compound east of Los Angeles (“Gold Base” situated near the town of Hemet, in Riverside) dozens of managers for the Church of Scientology endured an unusual trial by fire. The church called it “ecclesiastical discipline,” part of the religion. But some managers came away with stories so troubling they attracted the attention of the FBI. They tell of incarceration. violence and abuse in a place called “the Hole.” The church says their stories are lies and exaggerations.

This is the most detailed account yet of what happened inside the Hole. It is based on numerous interviews with a dozen former members of the church’s religious order, the Sea Org, and on information found in church materials and court testimony.

A written version of this report, in the form of a magazine article, is available here.

The video window can be seen after the ‘More…’ link.

Continue reading

2013 Scientology defectors describe violence, humiliation in “the Hole”

tampa bay timesTitle: 2013 Scientology defectors describe violence, humiliation in “the Hole”

Author: Tampa Bay Times

Full Text Online: HTML

Description:

For years in a desert compound east of Los Angeles (“Gold Base” situated near the town of Hemet, in Riverside) dozens of managers for the Church of Scientology endured an unusual trial by fire. The church called it “ecclesiastical discipline,” part of the religion. But some managers came away with stories so troubling they attracted the attention of the FBI. They tell of incarceration. violence and abuse in a place called “the Hole.” The church says their stories are lies and exaggerations.

This is the most detailed account yet of what happened inside the Hole. It is based on numerous interviews with a dozen former members of the church’s religious order, the Sea Org, and on information found in church materials and court testimony.

A video version of this report, including the interviews used in this article is available here.

Nightline Interview between Tommy Davis and Martin Bahsir

davis bashir interview2009 Interview between Tommy Davis and Martin Bashir | ABC Nightline (US)

This video includes accusation made against the church’s leader, David Miscavige, by ex-Scientologists that he is verbally abusive, and sometimes physically violent towards staff.

In the latter half of the programme, Church spokesman Tommy Davis was interviewed by  Nightline’s Martin Bashir and given an opportunity to present the Church of Scientology’s response. When Bashir asked Davis about the church’s alleged secret core beliefs that have been divulged by former Scientologists, Davis took theatrical offence,  eventually walking out in the middle of the interview, tearing off his microphone and throwing it on the floor.

Video of this interview is split into six parts, which can be viewed after the break. Continue reading